LVN / LPN Schools

Licensed practical nurses (LPNs), or licensed vocational nurses (LVNs), care for the sick and injured under the direct supervision of physicians and registered nurses. Most LPNs provide basic bedside patient care. They perform duties such as taking vital signs, give injections, monitor catheters, apply dressings, treat bedsores, and give alcohol rubs and massages. LPN's or LVN's also assist with bathing, dressing, and personal hygiene. In some states, they may administer medications or start IV fluids. According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the average LPN salary was $33,970 in May 2004. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $24,480, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $46,270.

Practical Nursing and Vocational Nursing Prerequisites

To get into an LVN or LPN program, you usually need a high school diploma or GED. Most practical nursing training programs are available from technical and vocational schools, or from community and junior colleges. Most practical nursing programs last about 1 year and include both classroom study and supervised clinical practice. LPNs can advance to become charge nurses who oversee the work of other LPNs and of nursing aides. Some LPN's also choose to become registered nurses through numerous LPN-to-RN programs. Currently licensed LVN's can greatly expand their nursing career opportunities and earning potential by enrolling in an LVN to RN program.

LPN/ LVN Degree Programs

Find out more from the schools below that offer LVN/LPN degrees or LVN to BSN (LVN to RN) degrees by requesting information or you can learn more about becoming a licensed practical nurse.

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Practical Nursing Schools by State

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